CHEEC Seed Grants: FY 1999

Residential Radon Decay Product Exposure and Lung Cancer: The Use of a Novel Radon Progeny Device to Improve Dose Estimates
RW Field, Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, DJ Steck, Department of Physics, St. John's University

Development of Laboratory Techniques for the Study of Heterogeneous Chemistry of Environmental Contamination on Mineral Aerosol 
PD Kleiber, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa

Parental Pesticide Exposure and Pregnancy Outcomes Phase I: Evaluation of Self-Reports of Pregnancy History Information 
PA Romitti, CF Lynch, Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa

Evaluation of an Assay for Environmental Estrogens in Effluents from Iowa Wastewater Treatment Facilities 
R Summerfelt, Department of Animal Ecology, E Farrar, Department of Zoology, Iowa State University

 


Residential Radon Decay Product Exposure and Lung Cancer: The Use of a Novel Radon Progeny Device to Improve Dose Estimates
Investigators: RW Field, Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, DJ Steck, Department of Physics, St. John's University 
Radon decay product (progeny) produces lung cancer in underground miners, yet epidemiologic studies examining residential radon gas exposure and lung cancer has yielded inconclusive results, raising the issue of whether residential radon progeny exposure poses a significant health risk. Radon decay products and not the radon gas itself deliver the radiological significant doses to the lungs, thus exposure risks need to measure actual radon progeny concentrations. This study proposes to update lung cancer risk estimates previously used in the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study using radon progeny dose measurement.

Publications:  Field RW, Steck DJ, Smith BJ, Brus CP, Fisher EL, Neuberger JS, Platz CE, Robinson RA, Woolson RF, Lynch CF; Residential Radon Gas Expusre and Lung Cancer: the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2000; 151(11):1091-1102

Field RW, Smith BJ, Steck DJ, Lynch CF; Residential radon exposure and lung cancer: variation in risk estimates using alternative exposure scenarios. J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2002; 12(3):197-203

Development of Laboratory Techniques for the Study of Heterogeneous Chemistry of Environmental Contamination on Mineral Aerosol 
Investigator: PD Kleiber, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa 
The objective of this work is to develop new laboratory techniques for the study of heterogeneous processes involving environmental contaminants on mineral aerosol particle surfaces (such as wind blown soil) under conditions of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity appropriate to the troposphere and surface boundary layer. New laboratory strategies are needed to quantify the chemistry and physical transport process of aerosol particles under atmospheric conditions, and to investigate how these processes affect the fate of key environmental contaminants.

Publication:  Prince A, Wade J, Grassian V, Kleiber P, Young M; Heterogeneous reactions of soot aerosols with nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid: atmospheric chamber and Knudsen cell studies. Atmospheric Environment. 2002; 36

Parental Pesticide Exposure and Pregnancy Outcomes Phase I: Evaluation of Self-Reports of Pregnancy History Information
Investigators: PA Romitti, CF Lynch, Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa 
This study will evaluate the quality of self-reports of pregnancy history information provided by female spouses enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a prospective cohort study of the occurrence of chronic disease among pesticide applicators and their spouses. Spouse self reports of pregnancy history information will be compared to those constructed from vital record data. Findings from this study will provide insights into the quality of pregnancy history information available in the AHS and preliminary data for future proposals.

Evaluation of an Assay for Environmental Estrogens in Effluents from Iowa Wastewater Treatment Facilities 
Investigators: R Summerfelt, Department of Animal Ecology, E Farrar, Department of Zoology, Iowa State University 
This study hypothesizes that sewage treatment lagoons of Iowa towns contain levels of estrogenic substances that are sufficient to cause endocrine disruption in fish when they discharge to streams. Effluents of municipal wastewater treatment facilities contain alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEs), which degrade to products that act as estrogen mimics, as well as ethynylestradiol. In this study, blood samples of caged fish held in lagoons will be examined for the presence of a specific blood protein, vitellogenin (VTG), which is normally produced by females. VTG is a biomarker of endocrine disruption when it is found in elevated concentration in female fish and present in the blood of male fish. Quantitative techniques will be developed to assess the level of VTG being produced by the fish.

Publication:  Bringolf RB, Summerfelt RC; Reduction of estrogenic activity of municipal wastewater by aerated lagoon treatment facilities. Environ Toxicol Chem. 2003; 22 (1):77-83